Kill Your Church

Steve McCoy killed his Missional Baptist Blog last week. It was a great forum for missional folks to connect with likeminded people and discuss everything from theology, ministry, culture, and whatever else we wanted. I am thankful for Steve’s hard work in maintaining it, and always keeping the discussion fresh and interesting. While I admit that my favorite comment threads were the ones where some wacko would come in and make a couple of crazy remarks and Steve would end up banning him, I think it’s really cool that he shut it down.

Why? Because he says that it served its purpose. His blog networked many of the missional leaders in the States and on the mission field. We’ve worked together to define what we’re about, and we’ve shared ideas of how that might look in the real world. Now, most of us have our own blogs, many of which feature the same comments we were making on his site. Missional Baptist Blog had done what Steve set out to do with it, and now it is time to move on. I think we could learn something from that.

What if all the pastors that read his blog stood up in front of their churches this Sunday, and instead of preaching a sermon, simply announced that they were going to let the church die? Something like: “Folks, I have an announcement to make. We’re selling the building, and I’m getting a job at Home Depot.” I think it would be a great thing. I’m wondering if most of our churches haven’t already reached their expiration date.

Has your church built up leaders? Do you have a real spiritual family that is missionally active in the community? Have you subdivided into Bible Study groups or cell groups? Maybe it’s time to shut everything else down. You don’t need a building. You don’t need professional ministers. You don’t need any of the programs that you’ve got going on. If the system that you’ve maintained has served its purpose, shut it down.

I believe that this sort of thing is what it would take to make “Christianity” as we know it in the 21st century make sense for me, and I don’t think I’m alone.

About E. Goodman

Ernest Goodman is a missiologist, writer, teacher, and communications strategist.